Amazon AZ States TaxJar

New and Improved Arizona State Report for Amazon FBA Sellers

by Kevin Reeth

Arizona Sales Tax

After many months of customer feedback, research and software redesign, we’ve released a major upgrade to the Arizona sales tax report. So major, in fact, that the layout looks almost exactly the same.

I kid, but not really. The most important changes in the report are not the layout, but in the numbers themselves. There are 3 important changes:

1. Arizona counties, when calculated tax owed, include both the 5.6% state and the local county transaction privilege tax (i.e. sales tax.) Well, now, so does our sales tax report, on both the Actual and Expected views.

2. TaxJar now respects inter-state use tax transactions. Why is this important? Because when an order ships to an AZ customer from a location outside Arizona (e.g. an FBA warehouse in San Bernadino,) Amazon collects use tax on that order. And in Arizona, counties have no use tax. So, you will no longer see inter-state sales included in the County rows of the sales tax report. But, those interstate sales still have state and possibly city use taxes collected. Where do they show up? That leads us into the final change.

3. There is a new row and amount near the bottom of the Arizona sales tax report for “Excess state tax collected.” This represents the total state sales tax that was collected on inter-state sales (because those totals would not be included in the County rows – remember, counties don’t collect use tax.) Any city use taxes collected on interstate sales would still show up under the respective City row.

az_sales_tax_report_oct_2016

We know this reflects a pretty significant change, but hopefully it makes filing in Arizona much easier for FBA sellers.

As always, please let us know if you have any feedback or questions. Email us at support@taxjar.com.

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